I AM NIKON Blog

Artillery Passage Spitalfields, London by photographer Steve Ullathorne

Think of London and you probably imagine red buses, The Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace and Big Ben, but head down a side street and you’ll find a diverse city with Georgian Squares, Roman Walls and some of the most exciting modern architecture in the world.

NIKON D3 with a Nikon 28-70 F2.8 lens, F-stop f/22, Exposure time 1/2 sec, ISO-100, Focal length 42mm, Max aperture 3, © Steve Ullathorne

Artillery Passage in Spitalfields, East London  NIKON D3 with a Nikon 28-70 F2.8 lens, F-stop f/22, Exposure time 1/2 sec, ISO-100, Focal length 42mm, Max aperture 3. © Steve Ullathorne


Steve Ullathorne
has lived in London for nearly 30 years. He is the former president and current member of The Camera Club in London, one of the oldest photography clubs in the UK. Artillery Passage in Spitalfields, East London, just across the road from the financial centre of London, is one of his favourite places to take photographs in the UK’s capital.

“The Spitalfields area couples historic 18th century brickwork with the 21st century glass and steel that typifies London today. The area is home to some of the most vibrant independent designers and artists, selling their wares at Old Spitalfields Market and Brick Lane, where the new influx of Bangladeshi immigrants have slowly replaced the traditional Jewish area with Curry Houses and Sari shops. To photograph this space is to capture the hustle and bustle of London, and simultaneously absorb the historic backdrop of one Europe’s most emotive landscapes.”

Old Spitalfields Market is a short walk from both London Liverpool Street tube station and Shoreditch High Street overground line in central London.

Steve’s tips for capturing Artillery Passage in East London:

  • Don’t worry if the sky is flat and grey, after all it is London, just keep your shooting angle down and concentrate on the architecture. A sky like that means you won’t have harsh shadows on buildings, so use it like a big soft box and see it as an advantage.
  • Check the weather forecast before you set out. If it looks like it is going to rain, consider incorporating the pavements in your shot as the reflections on the wet paths will look great.
  • Select the smallest aperture and a long exposure to blur the pedestrians passing by (F22 with the shutter speed at 0.5 seconds). This will allow you to capture more texture and detail in the frame.

Visit the our blog next week for the ‘Hidden View of Barcelona‘.

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I AM | LIFE AS IT HAPPENS

Thursday 20th March was World Storytelling Day, and to celebrate Nikon Europe invited 18 bloggers, who regularly post about urban life, to tell the story of their city in a day.  The unique aspect of this challenge? These  storytellers were armed with a Nikon D5300 and asked to capture and upload images instantly using the camera’s Wi-Fi function that connects it directly to a smart device, as an audience watched the stories unfold live on Storify.

Then, a panel of three judges, professional photographer, Kirsty Mitchell; Nikon School Manager, Thomas  Maquaire; and visual artist, Johan Thornqvist, reviewed each blogger’s entries, assessing firstly the story they told and secondly the photography skills they demonstrated during the challenge.  The panel were highly impressed with all of the entries, but there could only be one winner.

Congratulations to Nikon Blogger Challenge champion, Parisian blogger, Audrey Felix, who told the story of her home city. Named ‘Paris en couleurs’, she captured the ebb and flow, architectural significance and unquestionable beauty of the French capital – all linked by a charming colour pallet.

'Paris en couleurs 1' The first image submitted by winner Audrey Felix.

‘Paris en couleurs 1′ The first image submitted by winner Audrey Felix.

“The images really answer the brief and tell the story of someone wandering through a city and immersing themselves in its beauty. Her first image (above) is one of my favourites in the competition; she showed us a stolen moment in time.” Said judge Kirsty Mitchell.

One of the winning photographs by Audrey Felix.

One of the winning photographs by Audrey Felix.

'Paris en couleurs 4'. By winner Audrey Felix.

‘Paris en couleurs 4′. By winner Audrey Felix.

'Paris en couleurs 5'. By winner Audrey Felix.

‘Paris en couleurs 5′. By winner Audrey Felix.

““For me, the central narrative is the time encapsulated in the series. As darkness falls, the city becomes full of colour, washed with orange warmth at the end of what is a graphic, clinical start to the collection.” commented Johan Thornqvist

'Paris en couleurs 7'. By winner Audrey Felix.

‘Paris en couleurs 7′. By winner Audrey Felix.

“I like that the title tells the whole story – the photography doesn’t lie to us. It’s not trying to suggest anything other than a snapshot of someone’s personal, unassuming viewpoint and journey through a city from morning to evening.”  Noted judge Thomas Maquaire.

You can also visit Audrey Felix’s blog here.

In second place, Tihomir Stojanović  from Serbia with his enchanting story, Wandering Belgrade .  The Nikon enthusiast and culture blogger’s images told a personal tale which portrayed real emotion and a sense of loneliness.  He took the viewer on a journey through his city, wandering from old to modern parts of Belgrade, showing both the past and the future.

'Wandering Belgrade' by Tihomir Stojanović.

‘Wandering Belgrade’ by Tihomir Stojanović.

'Wandering Belgrade' by Tihomir Stojanović.

‘Wandering Belgrade’ by Tihomir Stojanović.

“This story was the most personal of all the entries and I felt like I was wandering alongside the photographer.” commented judge Kirsty Mitchell.

'Wandering Belgrade' by Tihomir Stojanović.

‘Wandering Belgrade’ by Tihomir Stojanović.

 “The absence of people and the only living creature visible in the photographs being the dog running away from the camera adds to the solitary feel of the story.” Noted Johan Thornqvist.

'Wandering Belgrade' by Tihomir Stojanović.

‘Wandering Belgrade’ by Tihomir Stojanović.

'Wandering Belgrade' by Tihomir Stojanović.

‘Wandering Belgrade’ by Tihomir Stojanović.

 “Stojanovic is a very talented photographer with excellent framing skill – it is particularly well executed in these pictures where the different lines in the image cross so well.” Stated judge Thomas Maquaire.

You can see Tihomir’s blog here.

In third place was lifestyle blogger Stella Harasek for Postcards from Helsinki. From the first to the last picture, Stella used a range of photographic styles.

'Postcards from Helsinki 1' The first entry by Stella Harasek.

‘Postcards from Helsinki 1′ The first entry by Stella Harasek.

The last photograph submitted by Stella Harasek.

The last photograph submitted by Stella Harasek.

Her considered and quiet pictures portrayed an interesting, personal and poetic perspective of the city.

'Postcards from Helsinki 9' by Stella Harasek.

‘Postcards from Helsinki 9′ by Stella Harasek.

“Although this lacked a clear narrative it featured some beautiful shots and this hotel image is one of the best photos submitted to the entire competition.” Said judge Johan Thornqvist.

Her blog is here.

Notable mentions

With such high levels of creativity and photography on display, there were two other competitors who deserve a special mention. Firstly, Milan Maglov’s  story Love is in Belgrade showed us the Serbian city through the life of a loving couple.

'Love is in Belgrade' by Milan Maglov.

‘Love is in Belgrade’ by Milan Maglov.

'Love is in Belgrade' by Milan Maglov.

‘Love is in Belgrade’ by Milan Maglov.

'Love is in Belgrade' by Milan Maglov.

‘Love is in Belgrade’ by Milan Maglov.

“As his story unfolded we realized it was a tale of an aging couple. It was a lovely way of bringing life into the city, as the purpose of cities is to support our lives.” Said Thomas Maquaire.

You can also read Milan’s blog

Finally, Steffen Gothling’s story Rush Hour also captured clever, graphic images to portray Berlin during the city’s rush hour. His blog is here.

'Rush Hour' by Steffen Gothling.

‘Rush Hour’ by Steffen Gothling.

 

'Rush Hour' by Steffen Gothling.

‘Rush Hour’ by Steffen Gothling.

Thanks to everyone who supported this challenge – from the competitors to the judges.

You can see all of the entrants’ images on the Nikon Challenge Storify stream.  What are your thoughts on the competition – which ones would you have selected? Add your comments and thoughts here.

See how the D5300 could help you tell your city-life story. With built-in Wi-Fi and GPS, this impressive 24.2-megapixel DX-format camera lets you capture and share your world in incredible detail.

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In the first of a new series of blog posts, we present five of Europe’s most-visited cities – Barcelona, Berlin, London, Rome and Paris  – in a new light. We asked one photographer in each city to provide capture a shot that shows a ‘hidden view’ of their city. We also asked them to provide tips to help visitors capture their city in interesting ways. Here, French photographer, Gerard Planchenault, presents his selection that shows a hidden view of Paris.

Pont Saint Michel, Paris by photographer Gerard Planchenault  

In this stunning black and white shot, Gerard captures a unique perspective of the grand Notre Dame taken from underneath the Pont Saint Michel bridge.

NIKON D3S, with a 24-70mm lens, f/2.8G, ISO 200, Aperture f/14, Speed: 2,5s. © Gerard Planchenault

NIKON D3S, with a 24-70mm lens, f/2.8G, ISO 200, Aperture f/14, Speed: 2,5s. © Gerard Planchenault

Paris – the city of lovers – has long been a destination of choice for everyone wishing to experience the ‘joie de vivre’ of French life, culture and cuisine. Capital city since 508 AD, Paris has been a focal point of European culture, politics and society for centuries. Today, Paris is home to many must-see landmarks for a city-traveller: The Eiffel Tour, The Louvre and The Champs Elysées, to name a few. Yet in addition to these traditional photo subjects, Paris’s galleries, bridges, and monuments offer another view of this fascinating city.

You can see the complete set of photographs Gerard took for the Hidden View assignment here

Our hidden view photographer, Gerard, points out that many people often underestimate the potential for great shots along the banks of the River Seine. “The banks of the Seine are an interesting and unusual way to discover Paris. Just strolling along them can awaken your creativity, which will help you take more original and spectacular photos.” Says the long time photography teacher.

His favourite hidden spot in Paris is by the Pont Saint Michel bridge on the River Seine. There lays a fantastic spot to capture Paris’s beautiful architecture and an alternative view of one of its most famous landmarks, The Notre Dame. The Pont Saint Michel bridge is found in the centre of the city and links Place Saint-Michel on the left bank to the Île de la Cité – one of two remaining natural islands in the Seine (the other being the Île Saint-Louis).

Gerard’s tips:

  • “If you are planning to shoot in colour, try taking your shot at sunset. The moment when the sky is deep blue and the city lights are starting to turn on, can create a beautiful effect.”
  • A tripod and a flashlight are useful, but if you don’t have these with you, make sure the ISO sensitivity is high
  • Remember, there are no set rules: photographers must choose their own framing, camera angles and focus settings in relation to how they feel about each location

See the complete set of photographs Gerard took for the Hidden View assignment here

Visit the I Am Nikon blog next week for the ‘Hidden View of London’. 

 

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“These young photographers are talented and ambitious. It was great to be able to give them this opportunity to learn from some of the best in the world.” Frank Zuidweg, Nikon Europe.

Earlier this month, NOOR and Nikon invited 14 photographers to Istanbul to start an intensive five-day Masterclass in Documentary Photography. Selected from 153 unique portfolios from 13 different countries, achieving a spot in this sought-after annual event was an achievement in itself.

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

During five days, the 14 participants, learnt from veterans like NOOR photographer Stanley Greene, who has been capturing the trials and tribulations of mankind for 25 years. The participants also learnt from fellow NOOR members Andrea BruceBenedicte Kurzen, and Jon Lowenstein. Joined by Evelien Kunst, NOOR’s managing director, and Frank Zuidweg from Nikon. It was a unique opportunity for the attendees to gain new knowledge, improve skills and develop a personal vision to their documentary styles.

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

During the first few days the attendees had the opportunity for a one-to-one personal review of their portfolios and editing sessions with the NOOR team.  “It has been a great experience editing my work with Andrea and the other participating photographers,” said Achilleas Zavallis from Cyprus. “Having the input from these photographers with diverse backgrounds, coming from different countries, gave me a new perspective on my own work. Being able to get their collective knowledge helps me to look at my work with a fresh set of eyes.”

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

As well as practical skills, topics such as ethics and storytelling were discussed. “I want to learn how to transform an idea into a visual story,” said one of the students, Yasaman Dehmiyani from Iran. “Documentary photography is not about a single image, but about showing a story from all angles,” said Frank Zuidweg.  “For me, the most important thing to do in news stories is to humanize them,” asserted Andrea Bruce, an award-winning photographer and one of the lecturers. “To show that people are living a day-to-day normal life, even in conflict situations. I see it as my role to educate the people that read the newspaper at the other end of the world.”

Ethical issues included altering content and misuse of images by clients when they take them out of context. “It is good that we are bringing up these examples of ethical misbehavior, since it is happening all the time in this industry and it jeopardizes our credibility,” said Stanley Greene. “We need to be responsible because the public trusts us and we have to make them trust us.”

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

The class was also given tips and advice on how to work with editors. Benedicte Kurzen stressed that if photographers have knowledge that editors might not have, they need to communicate it. “You know your country better that any editor who sits in an office in New York, London or Paris,” she said. This was expressed by one of the participants, Kursat Bayhan, who presented a project that his newspaper Zaman initiated, called Time in Turkey. This gave the group a great example of how a newspaper can understand the importance of photo features.

“The Masterclass was like a pressure cooker of feedback and experiences. It’s always hard to tell right after the event what the participants got out of it, since it was so intense.  A lot of the feedback and issues discussed need to sink in and over time things will start making sense. The immediate result is that we helped create a network of young talented photographers who can perhaps stay friends for life and help each other. For me that is valuable, since this is a lonely profession and there are no over-arching organizations for documentary photographers.” Said Evelien Kunst, managing director of NOOR.

The Masterclass will be repeated next year in March. So please stay tuned to the I AM NIKON Facebook community for next year’s location and entry details.

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

Photograph by Frank Zuidweg with Nikon D800E

Lenses used in photography: AF-S NIKKOR 35mm/1.8G ED and AF-S NIKKOR 85mm/1.8G

Celebrating this Masterclass, there is an exhibition of the participants’ portraits on the I AM Nikon Flickr account. A documentary portfolio of these future documentarians.

 

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The second part of an earlier blog post from March 10th in which photographer Kadir van Lohuizen talks about his experiences working with Young in Prison. This initiative aims to boost the future prospects of juvenile offenders by giving them creative photography projects, using COOLPIX cameras donated by Nikon.  In this post, Kadir presents the personal stories of two young men he worked with in Mzuzu Prison, Malawi.

——

ALBERT

Albert Mwale, Malawi. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen, Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen

Albert. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen

 

Albert is 21 years old and has been consigned to Mzuzu Prison for a 12 year sentence. He was prosecuted and jailed for robbery and raping a girl, according to the official judgement. However, he says that although the robbery did occur, the girl wasn’t a minor and agreed to have sex with him.

The family of Albert Mwale at home. Photographed by  Kadir van Lohuizen with Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen

The family of Albert at home. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen

 

Albert sits quietly in my classes, but is intrigued by the camera in front of him. He does seem to be lonely and feels abandoned and misunderstood. “I lost my youth and I wish it could have been different”, he says. In a way Albert is lucky, because he is in a prison in his hometown. If you are placed in a prison a long distance away from your family, life is much harder. The prison provides food once a day, but this rarely includes vegetables. Clothes, soap and other daily necessities need to be brought to you by your family or friends.

I visited Albert’s family. His parents are together and live on the outskirts of Mzuzu in a small house. He has five brothers and sisters, of which his parents can barely take care of. His father works as a watchman and earns 10,000 Kwacha per month (about 18 euro), while his mother is a housewife. The parents did own their own house, but had to sell it due to financial constraints. Now they are renting and have a small garden next to their house, where they grow vegetables to save money. They also have a son with a mental disorder, so life is far from easy.

The father works whilst a sister of Albert's plays. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen

The father works whilst a sister of Albert’s plays. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen

 

BALAKA

Balaka has been sentenced to three and a half years in prison for stealing a mobile phone. He very much regrets that he did this and that he has to pay such a high price for this simple crime.

Balaka Mgode. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen.

Balaka. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen.

 

He has friends in the prison, but life is tough. There is absolutely no privacy as he shares his cell with 35 other inmates. During the day, they go into the courtyard and mix with the adults, but by 3:30pm everyone is locked back in their cells. In these small spaces, there are no mattresses and no space to lie down, so they must all sleep in a sitting position.

Balaka's mother sells rice in the market. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen.

Balaka’s mother sells rice in the market. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen.

 

His parents visit him once a week. But they are not allowed to touch each other and speak through bars. Balaka has five brothers and sisters, who partly still live at home. They once owned a small farm in the countryside, but moved to the city now. An arrangement, which according to his parents, is harder because life is more expensive now. His mother sells rice in the market that his father buys from local farmers. They earn 40,000 Kwacha per month (about 69 euro).

Balaka Mgode's family. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen.

Balaka’s family. Photographed by Kadir van Lohuizen with a Nikon Df. Credit: Kadir van Lohuizen.

 

Balaka has really taken to the photography workshop I am teaching and hopes he can use these new skills when he gets out of Mzuzu Prison.

 

 

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NIKON D4S: The Expert’s Verdict © Bob Martin – Nikon D4S

NIKON D4S: The Expert’s Verdict © Bob Martin – Nikon D4S

If you’re going to put a pro D-SLR to the test, why not do it in one of the most challenging sporting arenas there is? That’s just what top sports photographer Bob Martin has been doing at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics with Nikon’s new flagship D4S. It’s already making waves for its frankly jaw-dropping ISO range: 100-25,600, extendable to an industry-leading 409,600 (equivalent). Bob’s verdict? Well, put it this way – he’s already ordered one…


Your first impressions out of the box?

 

Although I’d briefly seen the D4S before it was launched, Sochi was the first time I got to use it with vengeance! Nikon gave it to me in Sochi after I’d flown out there, so I just did test shots for the first couple of days at a few low-key events to ensure I could get the RAW files in Photoshop, which I did – although the best quality so far is with Nikon software.

 

There are minor ergonomic changes to the body shape from the D4, but as far as I’m concerned they’re just slight tweaks, and you quickly get used to them. Control-wise, the two cameras are still almost identical so you could quite happily use them side by side; if the D4S had felt very different and had very different controls then I wouldn’t have taken a chance with it in Sochi. I ended up using it for 14 days, so it’s had a pretty good test.

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 21: Victor An of Russia winning the gold medal in the Short Track Men's 500m Final A on day fourteen of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics at Iceberg Skating Palace on February 21, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.Picture bob Martinwww.bobmartin.com

SOCHI, RUSSIA – FEBRUARY 21: Victor An of Russia winning the gold medal in the Short Track Men’s 500m Final A on day fourteen of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics at Iceberg Skating Palace on February 21, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Picture by Bob Martin

 

How did you get on with the expanded ISO 25,600 range?

 

The D4 was a massive step forward with ISO, and the D4S marks another – it’s the highest you can shoot now and I don’t think I’ll ever use its full potential. Traditionally, sports photographers would never have gone above ISO 1600, then along came the D4 and you could go far higher, and now with the D4S I’ve been using ISO 8000, purely because I can – if it’s there, I might as well try it!

 

Depending on the lighting, the improved ISO sensitivity gives you between 1.5 and 2.5 stops more, and you don’t realise what that means until you’re shooting at ISO 4000 and it looks like ISO 1000. A stop and a half makes a vast difference, especially when you’re working so much with floodlights. I used to be shooting 1/500sec at f/2.8 and ISO 1600 at Arsenal under the lights – with the D4S I can now shoot 1/1000sec at f/4.0 using ISO 6400 and see the beads of sweat frozen on the players’ faces. It means you can shoot at night under floodlights with a 600mm lens and still freeze the movement.

 

So the big thing this camera gives me is the ability to absolutely stop the action under floods with a bit of cushion, and instead of using f/2.8 or f/4 you can rack up the ISO and go to f/5.6 and still get these perfect results. Take that fisheye bobsleigh team shot – 1/4000sec, f/4.5, ISO 4000 and it’s frozen perfectly, with no noise. I couldn’t have got that image before, even with the D4.

NIKON D4S: The Expert’s Verdict © Bob Martin – Nikon D4S

NIKON D4S: The Expert’s Verdict © Bob Martin – Nikon D4S

 

What about file quality?

 

The quality of the RAW digital files is mind-blowing – the competition is invisible by comparison! And the step-up in JPEG quality is very impressive, too. I always shoot RAW, with low-res JPEGs as reference files, but now the JPEGs are so much better – the tonality is smooth, with better skin tones across the ISO ranges – so for a newspaper or wire photographer who has to shoot JPEGs for speed, this will make a huge difference.

 

Talking of speed, how did you find the higher 11 fps rate?

 

It’s good, but what is really important is that Nikon have kept the huge buffer size, which means the D4S is usable for long bursts, even on RAW. The buffer is vastly superior to anything else on the market and it’s designed for shooting RAW – and for quality magazine photography when you’re shooting RAW, a big buffer is a big deal.

And the autofocus – that’s had a few changes, too…

 

While the AF on the D4 was pretty good, the D4S’s is a step up again. I really noticed its focus ability with the snowboarding events. What is really good about it is that it’s holding onto the subject for far longer. So if you’re using a larger lens like a 70-200mm or a 300mm and photographing somebody running towards you, gaining in size, it locks onto them more quickly and holds onto the focus for longer, which gives you a few extra frames. You can see it in the shot of the bobsleigh team running towards the camera – it was shot on a 500mm with a 1.6x converter, 1/1600sec at f/5.6 and ISO 5000 (and it looks no more than ISO 800!).

Bobsleigh: 2014 Winter Olympics: Russia 1 pilot Alexander Zubkov, Alexey Negodaylo, Dmitry Trunenkov, and Alexey Voevoda (03) in action during Four-Man Bobsled Heat 2 at Sanki Sliding Center. Krasnaya Polyana, Russia 2/22/2014 CREDIT: Bob Martin (Photo by Bob Martin www.bobmartin.comwww.bobmartin.com

Bobsleigh: 2014 Winter Olympics: Russia 1 pilot Alexander Zubkov, Alexey Negodaylo, Dmitry Trunenkov, and Alexey Voevoda (03) in action during Four-Man Bobsled Heat 2 at Sanki Sliding Center. Krasnaya Polyana, Russia 2/22/2014 CREDIT: Bob Martin (Photo by Bob Martin)

 

Any other things that particularly appeal?

 

The battery appears to last for longer, and it uses the same charger as the D4, which is a good thing. In an ideal world you want the same charger for all your batteries – in fact, you want all the same batteries, and the D4S’s battery is compatible with the D4, too. So the fact that I don’t have to carry different chargers and batteries if I’m using both a D4 and a D4S is good.

 

So what’s your overall verdict?

 

When I first saw the D4S’s spec prior to using it, I thought, ‘Oh, it’s not much different to the D4’ but when you use it you realise it is a lot different. You now have the capability to send your images 10x faster with the D4S’s Gigabit 100/1000TX ethernet port, the AF is better… but the ISO is the biggie. It’s the game-changer for which lenses you buy, which kit you take, how you approach your photography – and the more I use it, the more I realise that.

 

Think of how much you pay for a fast f/4 or f/2.8 lens over a slower one… the D4S is giving you a stop and a half over every lens, it’s opening up your lens choices for night time or floodlit situations. You can now work at f/5.6 instead of f/2.8 or f/4 just by racking up the ISO, and it’s not affecting your image quality too much. Since the fastest lenses are so heavy and it’s often really important to have the mobility that a lighter kit offers, this is a big deal.

 

You now have much more choice with your lenses – you might want the limited depth of field that super-bright f/2.8 lenses offer, but the compact, lighter 300mm f/4, for example, suddenly becomes very relevant. I took quite a lot of shots with the new 800mm f/5.6 and a 1.2x converter with the ISO way up, and the quality was phenomenal; I was really happy with it. It’s a particularly lightweight lens anyway, and with this camera it’s a game-changing lens, especially in snowy conditions and for indoor events where there’s no worries about heat haze. Normally when you up the ISO you’d get too much contrast; now it’s just smooth, and there’s so much detail in the pictures. Shooting at night with the D4S is almost the same as shooting in sunlight.

 

I’ve now ordered my own – it’s a no-brainer. The D4S is infinitely better than anything else on the market.

 

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 16: Jamaica 1 two man bobsleighon Day 9 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Sliding Center Sanki on February 16, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Picture by Bob Martinwww.bobmartin.com

SOCHI, RUSSIA – FEBRUARY 16: Jamaica 1 two man Bobsleighon Day 9 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Sliding Center Sanki on February 16, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Picture by Bob Martin

You can see more of Bob’s pictures at www.bobmartin.com

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